Report highlights North Devon health concerns

Joseph Bulmer

ALCOHOL abuse and obesity have been identified as key local public health concerns in North Devon and Torridge. Sexual and mental heath, as well as immunisation take up, were also highlighted among the priorities for the two areas in a Department of Healt

ALCOHOL abuse and obesity have been identified as key local public health concerns in North Devon and Torridge.

Sexual and mental heath, as well as immunisation take up, were also highlighted among the priorities for the two areas in a Department of Health report.

The annual Health Profiles give a snapshot overview of health for each region in England and are designed to help local government and health services to improve people's health and reduce health inequalities.

In North Devon and Torridge, obesity in adults was significantly worse than the national average. In both regions diabetes levels are also higher than the norm, while in North Devon more people claim incapacity benefits due to mental illness. The region also has more cases of malignant melanoma skin cancer and fewer children achieve five A*-C GCSE grades, including English and maths.

In Torridge, the health of people is generally good when compared to the rest of England, while in North Devon the figures are more in line with the national picture.

Compared to the rest of the South West, North Devon fares significantly worse when it comes to levels of incapacity benefit; children in poverty; early deaths from heart disease and stroke; men's life expectancy; physically active children; and infant deaths.

North Devon does better in terms of deprivation; teenage pregnancies; statutory homelessness; and physically active adults.

Meanwhile, Torridge performs poorly for GCSE achievement but scores significantly higher than the rest of the South West when it comes to hospital stays for alcohol related harm; deprivation; violent crime; new cases of tuberculosis; deaths from smoking; statutory homelessness; physically active children; and excess winter deaths.

News