Wandering artist creates beach pebble sculptures

A homeless artist who creates fantastic pebble sculptures as he wanders the UK coastline set up home at Hele Bay in Ilfracombe for a few days. The 33-year-old artist, George, who prefers to use his artistic pseudonym of Dr Geebers has created a free sta

A homeless artist who creates fantastic pebble sculptures as he wanders the UK coastline set up home at Hele Bay in Ilfracombe for a few days.

The 33-year-old artist, George, who prefers to use his artistic pseudonym of "Dr Geebers" has created a free standing 3D sculpture of a dog, a seagull and an ice cream cone at Hele using nothing but dry pebbles.

In fact The Pebble Man, as he is becoming known, has grown to be something of a minor celebrity since he set off on his odyssey from Brighton more than a year ago.

With just a sleeping bag and what he can carry in a rucksack, he has walked hundreds of miles, stopping off at beaches enroute to create his work.


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He has had no artistic training and yet his sculptures are intricate and carefully created using only stones gathered from the beach currently serving as his "studio."

His ready smile and a willingness to stop and talk has already won new friends. Some residents have taken him to their heart and regularly pop down to chat, bringing food and the odd donation.

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George does not claim benefits but relies on whatever donations people are willing to make to help finance the next stage of his journey to the next beach.

"I don't know if anyone has ever done anything like this before," he told the Gazette.

"I have been to 15 beaches and people say they have never seen it before in their lives. Ordinary everyday people just like to stand and stare - I have builders come up and ask how I managed to get the pebbles to stay like that.

"But I've had lots of help and support so far, people bring dinner out to me. I must admit I can't believe so many are willing to come out and do that."

The original idea was wholly spontaneous. He began the pebble art in Brighton with another homeless man, who has since moved on to other things. He knows his journey will became harder as winter approaches and he is not relishing trying to survive in sparsely populated areas such as Scotland.

At the end of it all he hopes to write a book chronicling his travels, interspersed with pictures of his art - and he hopes that through this, his work and his growing recognition, he can help other homeless people.

"Proceeds from the book would go to help the homeless," he said.

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