Stage show marks centenary of school

A century of education will be celebrated at Park Community School in Barnstaple this week with an innovative musical stage show that brings the story of the school to life. Third Light has been created by students and drama staff to commemorate the landm

A century of education will be celebrated at Park Community School in Barnstaple this week with an innovative musical stage show that brings the story of the school to life.

Third Light has been created by students and drama staff to commemorate the landmark milestone of the school's centenary year, from its beginnings as Barnstaple Grammar School to the present.

The lively musical begins tonight (Wednesday) at the school and runs until Saturday, with shows open to all and starting at 7.30pm in the School Hall.

It brings to life a hoard of real characters from the school's past and is inspired by a fascinating new book written by Park "old boy" Trevor Hill, who attended the school in the 1960s when boys and girls were still segregated.


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Both the play and Trevor's book, From Grammar to Park - 100 years of a Barnstaple school, are "must sees" for anyone who has attended the school or been involved with it and should invoke strong memories.

Third Light is a delightful tale played out against the backdrop of the story of the school during the past century.

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It begins with a story of young love skewed by time travelling mayhem as Barnaby, determined to prove his worth to his childhood sweetheart returns to the battlefields of the First World War to save his love's great uncle.

Meddling with history causes no end of problems for Barnaby and his fellow time travellers and rectifying this wrong brings them face to face with personalities from Park's past.

These include the strict headmaster known only as "ETLR" (E. Thomas Lancelot Reed) Haywood, feared by many a grammar school inmate during the 40s and 50s, plus "Waggles" Teace the moustachioed geography teacher who worked at the school for 35 years from 1910-1945.

Another early character is the poignant figure of Sam Trick, a poor farmer's son who became one of the first to attend the school on a scholarship but was killed on Messines Ridge during the war in 1917. Appearing in the play is his great great niece, Keanie Trick, who plays both herself and a 40s student.

Don't miss this well drawn tale of love, death, jealousy and history. Tickets are available from the school office, telephone (01271) 373131.

Trevor Hill's book is published by Halsgrove and priced at �198.99, available from local stockists or direct from Halsgrove Direct on (01823) 653777.

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