NORTH Devon Archaeological Society members filled a boat for a field trip up the Torridge from Appledore to see the visible remains of man s past along the foreshore. Their boatman was Appledore man Randolph Lamey, whose grandfather was skipper of the sch

NORTH Devon Archaeological Society members filled a boat for a field trip up the Torridge from Appledore to see the visible remains of man's past along the foreshore.Their boatman was Appledore man Randolph Lamey, whose grandfather was skipper of the schooner Hobah, the remains of which could be seen below Burrough Farm, Northam. Also slowly rotting there are the remains of the M.A. James, formerly a beautiful schooner. Several other hulks were identified, many of the ships having been requisitioned for wartime service, but returned in an unserviceable condition and beached where they lie today. One of the most interesting stories of the hulks relates to a schooner beached near Hinks Yard, Appledore, which was briefly owned by Oswald Mosely.As the group progressed up the estuary, the sites of many of the former shipyards were pointed out - since the 18th century there have been at least 18 on the Taw/Torridge- including Bank End, now a riverside housing estate and the Brunswick Yard, where the schooner Kathleen and May is currently berthed.Members also had a close-up view of Bideford's old bridge, the lime kiln at Landcross and the sea lock near Weare Giffard, where limestone was once transferred from barges to tub boats to continue the journey to TorringtonThe variety of birds seen en route was a surprise to many.The trip was led by Chris Preece and coincided with the launch of his new book A Field Guide to the Archaeology of the Taw and Torridge Estuaries, published by Edward Gaskell.