Four North Devon nurses have been honoured with Queen’s Nurse awards for their work and dedication.

Gina Rogers is a clinical matron and has been working as a nurse for 25 years.Gina Rogers is a clinical matron and has been working as a nurse for 25 years.

Northern Devon Healthcare NHS Trust clinical matron Gina Rogers, community matron Charlotte Emery and nurse team manager Anita Higgins have all been given the Queen’s Nurse title for their patient care and nursing practice.

A fourth award has seen NDHT safeguarding nurse and Queen’s Nurse of five years Sarah Winfield-Davies honoured for 21 years of community service.

Gina, Charlotte and Anita have more than 60 years of nursing experience between them across a wide range of NHS areas.

Lucy Bates, interim deputy chief nurse at NDHT said: “Our Queen’s Nurses have shown exceptional dedication to their patients and do a vital job enabling them to remain at home.

Charlotte Emery has worked as an advanced nurse practitioner for Devon doctors and as a community Matron in South Molton and Chulmleigh.Charlotte Emery has worked as an advanced nurse practitioner for Devon doctors and as a community Matron in South Molton and Chulmleigh.

“This award is very well deserved and demonstrates the depth of skills and expertise within our community services.”

Gina, Charlotte and Anita join a national network of supportive and caring Queen’s Nurses, including nursing colleagues working in Lynton, Holsworthy, Torrington and Bideford, and in specialist nursing areas such as care home staff training and support for patients with learning disabilities.

Sarah, who has been honoured for her long service, is currently supporting the Queen’s Nursing Institute to develop work on the after care needs of patients recovering from Covid-19.

She said working in the community was a ‘privilege’.

Anita Higgins works is community nurse team manager in South Molton and Chulmleigh.Anita Higgins works is community nurse team manager in South Molton and Chulmleigh.

Sarah said: “I remember feeling very scared and overwhelmed working in the community after previously working in a recovery department where there were doctors and nurses surrounding me every day.

“However, what was very clear from day one was that caring for patients and supporting their family in their own home is such a privilege and absolutely pivotal in healthcare. I had given this little consideration when working in an ‘acute’ setting role.

“The broad range of skills and autonomy required working as a community nurse enabled me to develop both personally and professionally at fast pace and subsequently has led to some incredible roles over the years.”

Queen’s Nurses benefit from development workshops, bursaries, networking and other opportunities.

Sarah Winfield-Davies, a NDHT safeguarding nurse, team lead and Queen’s Nurse for approximately five years, has been honoured for 21 years’ community service.Sarah Winfield-Davies, a NDHT safeguarding nurse, team lead and Queen’s Nurse for approximately five years, has been honoured for 21 years’ community service.

The title is given following an application process which includes feedback about the individual from managers and patients.