Piece of Barnstaple history is restored

A PIECE of Barnstaple's heritage has been lovingly restored and will stand pride of place in the entrance to the town's museum from next Monday (April 20). The original display shelving from the Brannam Pottery shop in Litchdon Street, built for the shop

A PIECE of Barnstaple's heritage has been lovingly restored and will stand pride of place in the entrance to the town's museum from next Monday (April 20).The original display shelving from the Brannam Pottery shop in Litchdon Street, built for the shop in the early 1900s by local craftsmen at Shapland and Petter, has been painstakingly bought back to its former, black lacquered glory.Brannam Pottery, known throughout the world for its colourful North Devon Art Pottery, opened the first showroom at its Litchdon Street workshops in 1886.The workshops and shop moved to the Roundswell Industrial Estate in 1989 and with the move went part of the original display shelving, which was kept in the small museum at the factory.The factory has since closed, but thanks to �2,500 funding from Devon County Council the display shelving has been fully restored and returned to the town centre for all to see.Council leader Brian Greenslade said: "Brannam Pottery has played such a significant part in the town's development over many, many years, as a local employer and contributor to the town. The family name also put Barnstaple on the national and international map, drawing fans of its pottery designs from far and wide to visit the shop in Litchdon Street. I am proud of our heritage and pleased that a piece of it - the original display shelving, which was itself made by local craftsmen - has been preserved and restored to its former glory for all to see and enjoy once more."Alison Mills, Community Heritage Officer of Barnstaple Museum, said: "The museum is so pleased to have been given funding to help make this project possible and we are delighted to be able to give these original Brannam showroom shelves a permanent home. They have been carefully restored in black shellac, with gold detailing, and look stunning, complementing the museum building so well.


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