DILAPIDATED classrooms at Chulmleigh Community College could be ripped out in the summer following news of a £1.4million cash boost from Devon County Council. The 12 wooden units, described as rat-infested rotting hulks, are set to be replaced with bran

DILAPIDATED classrooms at Chulmleigh Community College could be ripped out in the summer following news of a £1.4million cash boost from Devon County Council.The 12 wooden units, described as "rat-infested rotting hulks," are set to be replaced with brand new temporary classrooms that the council says will ready the college for the building of a new school as soon as central Government releases funding.The council's Executive was meeting yesterday (Tuesday) to rubber stamp a £235million funding pot to be spent on improvements to a number of the region's schools, including Braunton's Caen Primary School, Holsworthy Primary School and a £46.4million replacement of Bideford College.It is hoped that the classrooms at Chulmleigh will be replaced in the summer, as long as the new units can be sourced in time by the supplier.Chulmleigh governors issued the following statement: "The governing body are pleased and relieved to be able to clear the life-expired temporary classrooms and hope that this will be followed, as quickly as possible, by a feasibility study and a new build."The Governing body are hoping for a commitment to permanent buildings by Devon County Council and all political parties in order to support the whole school community. The governing body have set up a working party to support moving from an interim measure to a permanent solution."The council's deputy leader and schools portfolio holder Cllr John Smith said that the council had already removed and replaced some of the worst temporary classrooms at Chulmleigh."This new injection of £1.4million will enable us to remove the rest and replace them with new, temporary accommodation which will provide a high quality learning environment."At the same time, we have also allocated more money to Chulmleigh as one of the seven priority secondary schools in Devon where we will design a new school building so that when the Government decides to give us money under the Building Schools for the Future programme, we shall be ready to go."Chulmleigh's county councillor Joe Tucker said that the removal of the old temporary classrooms, some of which were built to house evacuees in the Second World War, signalled the first stage of the college's re-build. "This is very good news and exciting times for the community of Chulmleigh," he said.