THERE has been a huge response to our story about Ilfracombe mum of three Jayne Morrow and her campaign for health authorities to recognise new treatments in the battle against multiple sclerosis. Last week, the North Devon Gazette told how Jayne, 42, fac

THERE has been a huge response to our story about Ilfracombe mum of three Jayne Morrow and her campaign for health authorities to recognise new treatments in the battle against multiple sclerosis.

Last week, the North Devon Gazette told how Jayne, 42, faced spending £5,500 and travelling overseas for a radical new "liberation treatment" which has apparently had a number of successes in easing the debilitating illness.

It clearly struck a chord and the Gazette has been contacted by MS suffers keen to speak to Jayne, as well as messages via our website from as far afield as Canada and India.

Jayne, a personal trainer until MS forced her to give up work, is well known in North Devon, said:

"The response has been mad. Everywhere I go people know me and they have been stopping me to say they read the story, even at the supermarket and while having my nails done!

"Everyone seems to know someone with MS, so it's a real snowball effect and this story has made a big impact. |It's not only helped me, it's helped the cause and also given me inspiration to go on.

"For anyone suffering from illness it is a good message to get across - that there is always hope.

"Thank you to everyone who has taken an interest and thanks to the Gazette for all their help, it's been brilliant and really helpful."

Jayne wants the NHS to take more seriously treatment pioneered by Doctor Paolo Zamboni, who last year announced MS was caused by blockages to veins which connect to the brain, known as known as "chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency" (CCSVI.) He claims to have successfully treated patients using an angioplasty procedure to open the veins up.

She is also calling for more credibility to be given to an inexpensive drug treatment called LDN, far cheaper than current prescribed MS drugs but as yet not recognised by the NHS. Jayne has just started on the drug and pays for it herself.

She is also booked for a private scan in September in Glasgow to see if she suffers from the blocked veins and if so, will pay for the treatment herself but does not know where it might be available.

You can follow Jayne's campaign ands find out more about CCSVI and liberation treatment via her page on Facebook.