The story of Lynmouth’s overland lifeboat launch will be retold with a feature-length animated movie premiering at Lynton Cinema on the 120th anniversary of the epic feat of endurance.

A screenshot from Louisa An Amazing Adventure, showing the lifeboat being towed across the moors. Picture: Great British EntertainmentA screenshot from Louisa An Amazing Adventure, showing the lifeboat being towed across the moors. Picture: Great British Entertainment

Louisa An Amazing Adventure is based on the real-life heroics of January 12, 1899 when the crew and villagers successfully towed the 34-foot Louisa lifeboat 13 miles by hand from Lynmouth to Porlock to go to the aid of a ship in distress.

The movie by Great British Entertainment Ltd will be screened at Lynton Cinema from Friday, January 11 until Monday 14, to mark the anniversary.

The family film is music-driven and has no dialogue. It is directed and animated by Lynton based Ken Blakey and is the culmination of 12 years of work by producers Dave and Maz Reynolds.

Based on the historical events, it follows the extraordinary trek with a lifeboat across the moors in the depths of winter as the coxswain and his daughter must struggle with nature, choosing between personal loyalty and their duty to save the lives of strangers.

The 1899 Louisa crew.The 1899 Louisa crew.

The 86 minute movie will play twice daily at Lynton Cinema at 2.30 and 8pm.

The story of the 'overland launch' and the rescue of the ship Forrest Hall really is an occasion where real life is stranger than fiction.

When coxswain Jack Crocombe said 'we launch at Porlock', he set in motion one of the greatest maritime adventures of all time.

In the midst of a storm, assisted by teams of horses and villagers, the crew towed the heavy boat up the steep Countisbury Hill, along the undulating moors and down the steep one-in-four gradient of Porlock Hill to the sea.

A telegram from the movie Louisa An Amazing Adventure, telling of the ship in distress at Porlock. Picture: Great British EntertainmentA telegram from the movie Louisa An Amazing Adventure, telling of the ship in distress at Porlock. Picture: Great British Entertainment

When they got there, they relaunched the lifeboat and saved the ship and its crew.

A century later in 1999, a recreation of the journey in period costume and using just horses and manpower, showed just how incredibly difficult it just have been.

The Louisa was in service until 1906 and is recorded as having saved many lives and 11 vessels, including the Forrest Hall.

Lynmouth Lifeboat Station closed in 1944 after 75 years. The building was destroyed in the 1952 floods and it is understood all of the lifeboat records were lost.

The Forrest Hall.The Forrest Hall.

For more cinema information go to http://lyntoncinema.co.uk .

The crew of the 1999 Louisa re-enactment.The crew of the 1999 Louisa re-enactment.