A tsunami of discarded plastic inflatables has been turned into a spectacular piece of artwork at Croyde.

Children creating the art installation made from discarded inflatables left behind in Croyde in just one summer. Picture: Plastic Free North DevonChildren creating the art installation made from discarded inflatables left behind in Croyde in just one summer. Picture: Plastic Free North Devon

Children from local primary schools joined Plastic Free North Devon to create the 'wave of waste' art installation from the inflatables left behind by campers in just one summer.

Around 30 children contributed to the creation, which was made from broken or abandoned inflatable plastic lilos, mattresses and toys.

The group had to relocate to grass near Croyde beach due to strong winds.

Claire Moodie, chief executive of PFND, said last year the charity discovered the Wyatt & Jack company which reused and recycled old inflatables into new PVC accessories such as bags, so a local collection point was set up.

Claire said: "Seven campsites in Croyde happily agreed to take part and collected a lot more than we anticipated. The results, as you can see in our images, are truly shocking.

"We expected to find inflatable unicorns, rings and dinghies, but actually we received huge numbers of blow up camping mattresses.

"We collected more than 250 in just 10 weeks. There are more than 12,000 campsites in the UK which are more than likely experiencing the same sort of waste which could mean 500,000-plus are being ditched every year."

The school children took part in three workshops to engage them with the complexities of plastic pollution.

Children creating the art installation made from discarded inflatables left behind in Croyde in just one summer. Picture: Plastic Free North DevonChildren creating the art installation made from discarded inflatables left behind in Croyde in just one summer. Picture: Plastic Free North Devon

The team from Nurdle highlighted that what appears to be a clean beach can actually be a beach hiding billions of micro-plastics that get washed.

The PFND Virtual Reality Ocean Explorer workshop provided the opportunity for the children to learn more about the ocean.

The pupils attended a rock pool ramble to explore their local environment and some of the smaller creatures that live in and rely on it.

The children will go back to their schools and encourage their friends to want to protect the environment.

Schoolchildren finding out about micro plastic nurdles on Croyde beach. Picture: Plastic Free North DevonSchoolchildren finding out about micro plastic nurdles on Croyde beach. Picture: Plastic Free North Devon

Claire said: "Cheap products with very short life spans may be good for your wallet in the short term but come at a very heavy cost to our environment.

"Remember, part of the reason that these products, made in countries across the world, are so cheap, is because they are produced in countries where workers aren't necessarily paid or treated fairly for the work they do."

You can find out more and how to get involved at the PFND website www.plasticfreenorthdevon.org or Facebook page.