Torridge and West Devon MP Geoffrey Cox will stop working as a barrister following his appointment as Attorney General.

This Downing Street handout picture shows the Cabinet meeting and was tweeted by the Prime Minister with the accompanying text: This Downing Street handout picture shows the Cabinet meeting and was tweeted by the Prime Minister with the accompanying text: "Productive Cabinet meeting this morning - looking ahead to a busy week. And sending our best wishes to @England for tomorrow!" Picture:: Downing Street / Handout //PA Wire

Mr Cox was handed the role on Monday as part a Cabinet reshuffle, conducted in the wake of the resignations of David Davis and Boris Johnson.

The Torridge MP will now attend Cabinet meetings, his first of which took place on Tuesday. He replaces Jeremy Wright QC, who was announced as Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport after four years as the Attorney General.

A release from the Attorney General’s office said Mr Cox would cease all private practice as a barrister, just as previous law officers have done on their appointment.

Mr Cox co-founded his Thomas More Chambers practice in 1992, and was made Queen’s Counsel in 2003. According to the register of members’ interests, he earned more than £450,000 from legal work.

Commenting on his appointment Mr Cox said: “It is an honour to be appointed Attorney General for England and Wales.

“I look forward to building on the successes of my predecessor and I want to thank Jeremy Wright for his distinguished four years in the role.

“The Attorney General’s Office (AGO) is a unique and historic government department. I am proud to be joining the AGO, which has the highest staff engagement score in central Government.

“I look forward to working with the Solicitor General to play my part in making law and politics work together at the heart of the UK constitution.”

What does the Attorney General do?

The Attorney General is the chief legal adviser to the Crown and oversees the Crown Prosecution Service, Serious Fraud Office, Her Majesty’s Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate and the Government’s Legal Department.

In his role, Mr Cox will be the principal legal adviser on questions of EU and international law and human rights issues.

He can also refer lenient sentences to the Court of Appeal, and bring proceedings for contempt of court.