Reduced opening hours come into effect from April 1.

Opening hours at Devon County Council-run recycling centres, including ar Barnstaple's Seven Brethren (pictured), are to be cut from next month.Opening hours at Devon County Council-run recycling centres, including ar Barnstaple's Seven Brethren (pictured), are to be cut from next month.

OPENING hours North Devon recycling centres are to be cut from next month under money-saving measures being introduced by Devon County Council.

As the Gazette revealed last October, centres in Barnstaple, Bideford, Ilfracombe and Torrington will remain open seven-days-a-week, but the hours are being reduced by two hours a day on week days in the summer and an hour in winter.

However, Maclins Quarry in South Molton will only open on Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays, while Anvil Corner in Holsworthy will open from Friday to Monday inclusive.

The county council is also scrapping a temporary recycling centre for bulky waste at Lynton that visits four times a year.

And under the new arrangement, charities will now be charged for disposing more than 10 tonnes of waste per year.

The changes – expected to save the county council £1.2million 2014-15 – come into effect on April 1.

Councillor Roger Croad, cabinet member with responsibility for waste, said: “Waste, like all other services in the county must take its share of the overall efficiency savings being made and we feel that these changes will allow us to make the savings we have been tasked with.

“While Holsworthy and South Molton sites will see reduced hours, following feedback from residents, they will be open an extra day at South Molton and an extra two days at Holsworthy more than originally proposed.

“At Lynton, there remains the alternative option for residents to use the district council bulky household waste collection service.”

Cllr Croad called the decision to change the threshold for charities ‘a fair compromise’.

But the reduced opening hours have sparked fears for an increase in fly-tipping.

North Devon Councillor Rodney Cann, who is the executive member for waste and recycling, has condemned the proposals which he says will simply leave the district councils – and the tax payer – picking up the bill.

“I am deeply concerned about this latest cut back by the county council, because I believe it will undoubtedly lead to an increase in fly tipping around our district,” he said.