Bishop visits Calvert Trust

THERE was a busy schedule for the Bishop of Exeter during his second visit to North Devon in a month. The Right Reverend Michael Langrish spent a week touring the rural Shirwell Deanery, which includes Bratton Fleming, Kentisbury, Combe Martin, Berrynarbo

THERE was a busy schedule for the Bishop of Exeter during his second visit to North Devon in a month.

The Right Reverend Michael Langrish spent a week touring the rural Shirwell Deanery, which includes Bratton Fleming, Kentisbury, Combe Martin, Berrynarbor, Shirwell and Landkey.

As part of a continuing tour by local bishops to mark the 1100th anniversary of the Diocese, it was a chance for Bishop Michael to learn more about the rural side of the area, its issues, hopes and aspirations.

He visited local primary schools, hosted an informal open question and answer session at Bratton Fleming, joined the gamekeepers of the Earl and Countess of Arran at Filleigh for a traditional shoot and visited tourism attractions such as Watermouth Castle.


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He also joined a Ranger from Exmoor National Park to learn more about the life and work of the moor.

At the Calvert Trust Exmoor, near Blackmoor Gate - which provides activities such as sailing and horse riding for people with disabilities - Bishop Michael conducted an open air Holy Communion service beside Wistlandpound Reservoir.

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"I expected to be impressed by the Calvert Trust, but I did not expect to quite so impressed," he told the Gazette.

"The work it does for people with disabilities is hugely important, but it's clearly also making a serious economic contribution to this corner of North Devon, where successful enterprise is so important.

"During my visit I have been looking, listening, learning and hopefully encouraging. I think I know Devon pretty well, but every time I come here there is always something new to learn."

"I have a particular concern for North Devon; it's stunningly beautiful, but an area of great poverty.

"Cornwall and South Devon get funding, although North Devon is even more impoverished, but gets hidden in the figures for Devon as a whole.

"I am trying to play my role by telling the story and acting as an advocate for North Devon.

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