Binny Day took her life on anniversary of father’s death - inquest report

Much was made of the fact Binny Day took her own life on the same date as her father’s death 17 years earlier.

But her closest friend, who wants to remain anonymous, said the date was no more than a coincidence.

In May, 1989, an inquest heard how the 27-year-old mum of three had previously tried to take her own life.

A written statement by her husband, Ian Day, who she had married in June, 1988, revealed the marriage had suffered problems since Christmas of the same year.

He had decided to move out of the marital home, in Laburnum Road, Exeter, just before she died, but had not told his wife.


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A post mortem report showed Mrs Day died from multiple injuries, including a lacerated aorta, which was consistent with falling 200 feet.

Assistant deputy coroner Valerie Silverthorne said, from the evidence presented to her, Binny Day had taken her own life.

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Miss Silverthorne recorded a verdict of suicide.

The inquest report revealed: “The deceased has a history of unhappiness, although she did not consult her GP.

“She has, in the past, attempted take her own life and also made similar threats.

“Although still young, she has been married on three occasions and she has had many more relationships - many of them which have ended in absolute disaster.”

On the morning of March 3, 1989, the body of Binny Day was found at the bottom of 200 foot high cliffs at Budleigh Salterton.

Her body was spotted by a retired Exeter man as he walked along the beach.

The man had walked from Steamer Steps towards Sandy Bay, at Exmouth.

When he returned an hour later, at 12.30pm, he spotted a body 20 feet from the cliffs and telephoned the police.

Binny Day’s body was taken to the Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, where a post mortem revealed she had died from multiple injuries, including lacerations to her heart.

The pathologist said her injuries were consistent with a fall from such a great height.

A suicide note was never found.

When she was found, she still had her dog’s lead in her pocket – she had returned the pet to a friend shortly before she took her own life.

Her body was identified by her father-in-law.

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