Private Aaron Eastman was one of 64 soldiers to earn the badge after a gruelling five-day event in Grafenwöhr, Germany

Private Aaron Eastman, a soldier with the British Royal Armed Forces, maneuvers under constantine wire during the demonstration portion of a U.S. Army Europe Expert Field Medical Badge evaluation (U.S. Air Force photo by TSgt Brian Kimball)Private Aaron Eastman, a soldier with the British Royal Armed Forces, maneuvers under constantine wire during the demonstration portion of a U.S. Army Europe Expert Field Medical Badge evaluation (U.S. Air Force photo by TSgt Brian Kimball)

An army medic from North Devon has mastered one of the US Army's toughest tests.

Private Aaron Eastman successfully earned the Expert Field Medical Badge in Grafenwöhr, Germany on Friday, March 31.

The 22-year-old was among 215 candidates from 11 countries attempting to earn the badge during a five-day challenge.

"It feels extremely good that I have passed. That's probably underselling it," said Aaron.

Private Aaron Eastman, a U.S. Army Expert Field Medical Badge (EFMB) receipent with the British Royal Forces, speaks with U.S. Army Soldiers after finishing a final 12 mile EFMB ruck march during a U.S. Army Europe EFMB evaluation in Grafenwoehr, Germany (U.S. Air Force photo by TSgt Brian Kimball)Private Aaron Eastman, a U.S. Army Expert Field Medical Badge (EFMB) receipent with the British Royal Forces, speaks with U.S. Army Soldiers after finishing a final 12 mile EFMB ruck march during a U.S. Army Europe EFMB evaluation in Grafenwoehr, Germany (U.S. Air Force photo by TSgt Brian Kimball)

"Personally, I only know one other soldier in the British Army that has earned it. There are more soldiers out there, but certainly not many.

The EFMB competition involves medical tasks and evacuation tasks such as loading casualties onto vehicles or casualty drags and manoeuvres.

It also requires communication using the American radios and warrior skills including operating with American weapons and care under fire.

Other testing included a written exam, land navigation and a 12-mile road march.

Private Aaron Eastman, a soldier with the British Royal Armed Forces, tactically moves through an obstacle lane during the demonstration portion of a U.S. Army Europe Expert Field Medical Badge evaluation in Grafenwoehr, Germany on March 21, 2017. (U.S. Air Force photo by TSgt Brian Kimball)Private Aaron Eastman, a soldier with the British Royal Armed Forces, tactically moves through an obstacle lane during the demonstration portion of a U.S. Army Europe Expert Field Medical Badge evaluation in Grafenwoehr, Germany on March 21, 2017. (U.S. Air Force photo by TSgt Brian Kimball)

After being one of 64 candidates to earn the badge at the event, Aaron now hopes to help others earn the badge.

"I've already been asked to go back and help as one of the validators," he said.

"I can go back and help and teach others, which enables me to further my skills.

"My advice to anyone wanting to take part in the EFMB competition is to study hard and to be prepared for the physical and mental challenge.

"You're going to be tired, you may get a bit ill-tempered and lethargic, but stick with it and put the effort in."