A South Molton company is about to make its mark at a prestigious international rugby tournament.

Vic and Roshni Mahajan at Aramis Rugby with one of the digital scrum machines and (left) Wayne Walton and Hugh Marshall-Sims who also worked on the contract. Picture: Tony GussinVic and Roshni Mahajan at Aramis Rugby with one of the digital scrum machines and (left) Wayne Walton and Hugh Marshall-Sims who also worked on the contract. Picture: Tony Gussin

Aramis Rugby has manufactured three bespoke live scrum machines which this week were shipped out to appear at the Hong Kong Sevens tournament when it commences next month.

The interactive digital machines will enable fans or off duty players to experience live scrum action, with the real time force they are putting on the machine displayed on screen.

All three will be at different locations, including the stadium and fan village, and live linked by satellite.

It means people can compete directly against each other, with a running leaderboard for the highest scores and tournament organisers hope the experience will add an extra dimension for the fans and players attending.

The machines are all made in South Molton at the Aramis Rugby premises owned by the Mahajan family.

Husband and wife Vic and Roshni Mahajan are the directors of the North Devon operation, but the family company also has a factory in India and the company supplies rugby clothing and equipment to clubs around the UK and Europe.

Last year South Molton was visited by representatives from McCann-Eriksson, which is handling tournament marketing for Cathay Pacific.

Roshni said: “This project is a huge boost for our company and is definitely a feather in the cap of the larger North Devon business and industrial community.

“In their words they said we were the only company throughout the world that could actually deliver their vision of a combination of scrum machines and electronics.”

Last year Aramis provided digital scrum machines for the Six Nations and the ‘Scrum and Have a Try’ feature proved a big hit with fans at Murrayfield.

The technical design work is completed by Roshni and the machines are made using the skills of several South Molton trades people.

The company also works closely with former England international and British Lion Nigel Horton, to develop and promote the machines for professional rugby clubs.

They feel it could well be the next stage in sports science, as the machines enable coaches to accurately analyse their scrum formations, the forces used and the performance of individual players.