There were celebrations in South Molton on Thursday, as the town’s one-stop shop for services and its rehomed library reached its 10th anniversary.

The Amory Centre in South Molton.The Amory Centre in South Molton.

The Amory Centre opened in on November 1, 2008, putting community, council and statutory services under one roof.

A decade later and the centre in East Street was celebrating its anniversary, with a special cake cut by Pauline Miller, Lorraine Nicholls and Susan Andrews, three members of staff who have been there since it opened.

As well as the cake cutting, a cake sale was being held in aid of the CAB and a Hidden Histories talk and presentation was being given by Beaford Arts focusing on South Molton and the surrounding area. A memories book has also been placed in the library where people are encouraged to share their memories of the library, past and present.

Deputy Mayor of South Molton, Councillor Jean Foster, said the centre had become ‘absolutely pivotal’ to the town.

Susan Andrews, Pauline Miller and Lorraine Nicholls were joined by Councillor David Worden, Deputy Mayor Jean Foster and former district councillor Sue Sewell in cutting the cake for the Amory Centre's 10th anniversary. Picture: Matt SmartSusan Andrews, Pauline Miller and Lorraine Nicholls were joined by Councillor David Worden, Deputy Mayor Jean Foster and former district councillor Sue Sewell in cutting the cake for the Amory Centre's 10th anniversary. Picture: Matt Smart

“There was a lot of cooperation and a lot of hard work that went into this,” she said.

“We’re celebrating 10 years but in fact we started working on this in 2003.

“It took five years of turning an old doctor’s surgery and an antiquated library into a one stop shop centre.

“This was a major change for South Molton and I am so delighted it’s become the heart of the town.

“Thank you to the town, district and county council who came together for it to become a million-pound project.”

The £1.3million project saw a total of £700,000 contributed by the county, while the town council put in £250,000. North Devon contributed almost £280,000 and Devon Renaissance £60,000.

As the town has grown, the town council has encouraged local groups and national agencies like the Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB) to use the building too.

The library hosts regular events and community based projects which has encouraged use of the centre.

Former district councillor Sue Sewell fought hard to make the Amory Centre become a reality.

She said: “My vision was somewhere people could drop in and find every bit of information they could get to make their life easier, whether it was benefits, planning, or speaking to the town council.

“We just wanted everything useful under one roof.”