Porbeagle shark hooked off North Devon ‘not likely to be a danger’

The big shark is brought to the side of the boat. Pic: Graeme Pullen/bnps. The big shark is brought to the side of the boat. Pic: Graeme Pullen/bnps.

Wednesday, May 21, 2014
1:42 PM

Marine Conservation Society reassures bathers that porbeagle shark is most commonly found out ‘well out at sea’.

To send a link to this page to a friend, you must be logged in.

THIS week a porbeagle shark was hooked off the coast of North Devon – but just how common are these toothy creatures?

Richard Harrington, of the Marine Conservation Society, said the porbeagle was not likely to be a danger to people bathing on the beaches.

“It has a diet mainly of fish such as mackerel and cod, and tends to be found well out to sea.

“We are pleased to see the fish returned alive, as sharks and rays of many species are classed as threatened or endangered.

“The porbeagle is considered critically endangered in the North East Atlantic.”

The porbeagle is part of a group of sharks known collectively as mackerel sharks, belonging to the Lamnidae family.

Porbeagles are often found in the surface layers of the open ocean, and can also be found in coastal waters, like the one hooked off the coast of North Devon.

They live for around 30-40 years and can grown to a length of three-and-a-half metres.

Porbeagles are a highly migratory species – they can be found from Iceland and the Barents Sea all the way to North West Africa.

Up until 1970s when they became unprofitable, the North Atlantic population of porbeagle stocks were over-exploited by directed long-line fisheries.

0 comments

Comments

Welcome , please leave your message below.

Optional - JPG files only
Optional - MP3 files only
Optional - 3GP, AVI, MOV, MPG or WMV files
Comments

Please log in to leave a comment and share your views with other North Devon Gazette visitors.

We enable people to post comments with the aim of encouraging open debate.

Only people who register and sign up to our terms and conditions can post comments. These terms and conditions explain our house rules and legal guidelines.

Comments are not edited by North Devon Gazette staff prior to publication but may be automatically filtered.

If you have a complaint about a comment please contact us by clicking on the Report This Comment button next to the comment.

Forgotten your password?

Not a member yet?

Register to create your own unique North Devon Gazette account for free.

Signing up is free, quick and easy and offers you the chance to add comments, personalise the site with local information picked just for you, and more.

Sign up now

Join our newsletter

Local Search 24 – North Devon
Looking for a:

Location:

Search radius:

North Devon's trusted business directory